Monthly Archives: September 2019

The Truth Behind Artificial Sweeteners

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Do you know how artificial sweeteners act in your body? Nobody really does! Here are some thoughts as to how they affect your body, it may inspire you to reduce the sweetness in your food and drinks.

You probably know the negative health effects of eating too much sugar, especially “added sugars” like in soda pop, candy, baked goods, and many commercially-available cereals, salad dressings, marinades and sauces, just to name a few.  Added sugar is hiding just about everywhere in the grocery store.

Yes, ingesting refined sugar spikes your blood sugar and insulin, and increases your risk for a whole host of issues.

 A while ago, one of the food industry’s responses to the demand for lower-calorie foods that still taste great, was artificial sweeteners.

The idea behind them is that you can still get the sweetness, without the calories; like when you have a “diet pop” versus a regular one. Theoretically, this was going to help people maintain a healthy body weight, and hopefully not increase anyone’s risk of heart disease, diabetes, or obesity.

But, it doesn’t always work out the way we think it will…

Types of artificial sweeteners

Sugar substitutes fall into several categories, but what they all have in common is that they have a sweet taste and fewer calories than plain sugar.

Today we’ll specifically discuss “artificial sweeteners,” which are synthetic chemicals where a tiny bit tastes very sweet.

They’re also known as “non-nutritive sweeteners,” and include things like:

  • Saccharin (Sweet & Low),
  • Acesulfame potassium,
  • Aspartame (Equal & NutraSweet), and
  • Sucralose (Splenda).

Health effects of artificial sweeteners

Negative health effects from artificial sweeteners are cited all over the place, and while many studies show effects, others don’t. Cancer? Maybe yes, maybe no. Heart disease? Maybe yes, maybe no. Not to mention that much of the research has been on animals, which may or may not translate to people.

I did want to point out one ironic thing to do with artificial sweeteners and weight.

One study found that people who tend to drink diet sodas have double the risk of gaining weight than those who didn’t.

Another study has shown an increased risk for metabolic syndrome and diabetes for those who consume diet drinks every day.

While these results don’t apply equally to everyone, they do somehow seem ironic, don’t they?

How do artificial sweeteners affect our bodies?

Now that’s a million-dollar question!

There are so many ideas out there to try to explain it, but the reality is we don’t know for sure; plus, it might play out differently in different people.

  • Is it because people feel that they can eat cake because they’ve switched to diet soda?
  • Perhaps it’s because the sweeteners change the taste preferences so that fruit starts to taste worse, and veggies taste terrible?
  • Maybe artificial sweeteners increase our cravings for more (real) sweets?
  • It can be that the sweet taste of these sweeteners signals to our body to release insulin to lower our blood sugar; but, because we didn’t actually ingest sugar, our blood sugar levels get too low, to the point where we get sugar cravings.
  • Some even say (and at least one animal study suggests) that saccharin may inspire addictive tendencies toward it. Addictive like eating behavior involves a lot more than just a lack of will power.  There are biochemical reasons why some people lose control over certain foods.  It has been linked to processed foods.  Processed foods are usually engineered to be “hyperpalatable” – so they taste super good.  They also contain high amounts of empty calories  (including artificial sugars), and cause major blood sugar imbalances
  • Maybe there is even a more complex response that involves our gut microbes and how they help to regulate our blood sugar levels.

Conclusion:

Understand that added sugar is not good for you, but the solution may not be to replace them all with artificial sweeteners.

I highly recommend reducing your sugar intake, so you naturally re-train your palate and start enjoying the taste of real food that isn’t overly sweet.  This way you’re reducing your intake of added sugar, as well as not needing to replace it with artificial sweeteners.

Try having ½ teaspoon less of sugar in your hot morning drink. Try reducing a ¼ cup of the sugar called for in some recipes. Try diluting juice with water.

 Your body will thank you!

Recipe (naturally sweetened): Sweet Enough Matcha Latte

Serves 1

1 teaspoon matcha powder

1.5 cup almond milk, unsweetened

1-2 teaspoons maple syrup or honey (optional)

1. Heat almond milk and maple syrup/honey (if using) in a small pot.

2. Add matcha powder to cup.

3. When almond milk is hot, add about a ¼ cup to matcha and stir to combine.

4. Add rest of the milk to cup.

 Serve & enjoy!

Tip: You can steep a chai tea bag in the milk if you prefer chai tea over matcha.

References

https://chriskresser.com/the-unbiased-truth-about-artificial-sweeteners/

Disclaimer:

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

A Blood work road map to your health goals

Here’s exactly how the Metabolic Balance® Diet will get you long term results.

Just think about it.

What’s the first thing you do when you think that something is wrong with your body?

You most likely go to the doctor.

And when you do go, they usually recommend blood work to make sure your blood markers are within normal ranges.

Fatigue, lack of motivation or concentration, weight loss, weight gain, dizziness, aches and pains…..the symptoms can be vast, so the first response to unexplained symptoms by most medical professionals is blood work.

Now, imagine instead of the doctor just prescribing NSAIDs or Beta blockers in response to your blood work, they decide to dive a little deeper.

For example, they took a lifestyle and dietary intake form, a complete medical history and mapped out changes that you could make within your lifestyle, as well as mapped out the foods that suit your specific biological needs.

Imagine you received a personalized health plan that could help to orchestrate the biochemical changes needed to help you lose weight and feel amazing, and that this plan knew exactly what you needed because it knew you from the inside out.

Well, that’s exactly what Metabolic Balance® diet is, and why it gets results every time.

What is the Metabolic Balance® diet and is it right for me?

The Metabolic Balance® diet is a personalized nutrition plan tailored to your own individual needs based on your blood work, and bio-markers from 34 different analyses. The results are combined with your entire health profile including height, weight, measurements, diseases, food allergies, medications and food likes/dislikes and tailored specifically to who you are and what you need. For more information contact me at tessanp@shaw.ca for your complimentary information session.

People following the Metabolic Balance® diet have seen improvements in:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Insulin resistance
  • Anxiety
  • Hormonal Issues
  • Struggle with sleep
  • Struggle with inflammation, aches and pains
  • Digestive issues like bloating, constipation or diarrhea
  • Struggle with infertility
  • Extreme food cravings and binge eating
  • Allergies and skin disorders
  • Liver and gall bladder issues

The Metabolic Balance® diet tackles these issues by examining your blood work markers, health history food preferences and your weight and measurements.

Every single plan has been developed by a doctor and nutritional therapists to be unique, and every person’s requirements have been tailored to their individual markers.

To read what the Metabolic Balance® diet science is saying read Tired of counting calories and obsessing about how much you eat? Consider focusing on what and how you eat instead!

Through the program, a naturally balanced insulin production is promoted, which is the “internal Key” to the body’s weight management system.  Not only is a healthy regulation of insulin a great way to lose weight and reduce cravings, but it also has a substantial effect on other hormonal and enzyme functions and production.

There is no calorie counting, point management, or percentage of fats, protein and carbs.

It’s an individualistic approach that helps your body “reset” its own natural metabolism by teaching the body what foods make it feel best, and what diet and lifestyle habits are leading to undesirable symptoms.

Once your body’s hormones are reset and balanced, your body will have a much easier time keeping the weight off, managing stress, keeping your blood sugars balanced, managing cravings, managing blood pressure, increasing your energy and reducing your inflammatory markers.

If you are wondering if the Metabolic Balance® diet is right for you contact me at tessanp@shaw.ca

Important small print you must read:
Disclaimer
The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

This post has been reproduced in part from an article published by  naughtynutrition. All permissions were granted from Metabolic Balance®

Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load. Is there a difference?

Have you ever had your blood sugar levels tested or heard about eating to balance blood sugar? Have you wondered about the science behind how foods affect blood sugar? Or more importantly, which foods affect your blood sugar more than others?

If so, this post is for you.

It’s all about the glycemic index and glycemic load. And it’s not boring, promise!

Have a read because you may want to pay attention to foods that are high on the glycemic index or high glycemic load. If you want to lose weight, blood sugar management is critical to control appetite, food binges and manage those crazy food cravings.

And if you’re at risk of blood sugar issues, pancreas conditions, or even diabetes this is IMPORTANT for you to know.

What is the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load?

Glycemic this and glycemic that. Does it matter?

You’ll notice that they both begin with “glycemic.” That’s one tip that they have to do with sugars and carbs. Not only how much sugar is in foods, but more importantly, how it affects your blood sugar levels.

In general, diets that are high on the glycemic index (GI) and high in glycemic load (GL), tend to increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

FUN FACT: Starches like those in potatoes and grains are digested into sugar; this is because starch is just a bunch of sugars linked together. Digestive enzymes break those bonds so that the sugars become free. Then those sugars affect your body the same way that eating sugary foods do.

Glycemic Index (“how fast”)

The most common of the two terms is “glycemic index” (GI).

As the name suggests, it “indexes” (or compares) the effect that different foods have on your blood sugar level. Then each food is given a score from 0 (no effect on blood sugar) to 100 (big effect on blood sugar). Foods that cause a fast increase in blood sugar have a high GI. That is because the sugar in them is quickly processed by your digestive system and absorbed into your blood. They cause a “spike” in your blood sugar.

So, you can probably guess that pure glucose is given a GI rating of 100. On the other hand, chickpeas are right down there at a GI of 10.

Regarding GI: low is anything under 55; moderate is 56-69, and 70+ is considered a high GI food.

Remember, this is a measure of how fast a carbohydrate containing food is digested and raised your blood sugar. It’s not a measure of the sugar content of the food.

How the carbohydrates in food affect your blood sugar level depend on other components of the food. Things like fiber and protein can slow the release of sugar into the bloodstream, and this can make even a high-sugar food, low on the GI scale.

So, lower GI foods are better at keeping your blood sugar levels stable because they don’t increase your blood sugar level as fast.

With the Metabolic Balance® plan, low GL carbohydrates alongside sufficient protein and fat reduce blood sugar spikes, helping with appetite control and resulting in the desired weight loss. Read more here.**

FUN FACT: Can you guess which food has a GI of higher than 100? (Think of something super-starchy) White potatoes! They have a GI of 111.

Glycemic Load (“how much”)

The glycemic load is different.

Glycemic load (GL) doesn’t take into account how quickly your blood sugar “spikes”, but it looks at how high that spike is. Basically, how much the food increases your blood sugar.

GL depends on two things. First, how much sugar is actually in the food. Second, how much of the food is typically eaten.

Low GL would be 0-10,  moderate GL would be 10-20, and high GL would 20+.

Example of GL and GI

 So, let’s compare average (120 g) servings of bananas and oranges:

Food GI Serving size (g) GL per serving
Banana, average 48 120 11
Oranges, average 45 120 5

Excerpt from: Harvard Health Publications, Glycemic index and glycemic load for 100+ foods

As you can see, the banana and orange have almost the same glycemic index.; this means they both raise your blood sugar in about the same amount of time.

But, the average banana raises the blood sugar twice as high (11) as the orange does (5). So, it contains more overall sugar than the same amount (120 g) of orange.

Of course, this is all relative. A GL of 11 is not high at all. Please keep eating whole fruits. 🙂

What does this all mean for your health?

Certain people should be aware of the effects that foods have on their blood sugar. People who have diabetes or pre-diabetes conditions like insulin resistance need to be aware of the glycemic index and glycemic load of foods they are eating regularly.

The GI and GL are just two factors to consider when it comes to blood sugar. Some high GI foods are pretty good for you but if you want to reduce the impact on your blood sugar, have them with a high-fiber or high-protein food.

Conclusion

If you have blood sugar imbalances or diabetes, you should probably be aware of the GI and GL of your food.

If you are at risk of diabetes or heart disease, you might try swapping out some higher GI/GL foods and replacing with lower GI/GL foods.

References:

http://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/glycemic_index_and_glycemic_load_for_100_foods

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/food-beverages/glycemic-index-glycemic-load

**Dr. Wolf Funfack, MD Metabolic Balance® Your Personalized Nutrition Roadmap-a natural approach to reaching your perfect body weight

the small print:

Disclaimer

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.