Tag Archives: cravings

A Blood work road map to your health goals

Here’s exactly how the Metabolic Balance® Diet will get you long term results.

Just think about it.

What’s the first thing you do when you think that something is wrong with your body?

You most likely go to the doctor.

And when you do go, they usually recommend blood work to make sure your blood markers are within normal ranges.

Fatigue, lack of motivation or concentration, weight loss, weight gain, dizziness, aches and pains…..the symptoms can be vast, so the first response to unexplained symptoms by most medical professionals is blood work.

Now, imagine instead of the doctor just prescribing NSAIDs or Beta blockers in response to your blood work, they decide to dive a little deeper.

For example, they took a lifestyle and dietary intake form, a complete medical history and mapped out changes that you could make within your lifestyle, as well as mapped out the foods that suit your specific biological needs.

Imagine you received a personalized health plan that could help to orchestrate the biochemical changes needed to help you lose weight and feel amazing, and that this plan knew exactly what you needed because it knew you from the inside out.

Well, that’s exactly what Metabolic Balance® diet is, and why it gets results every time.

What is the Metabolic Balance® diet and is it right for me?

The Metabolic Balance® diet is a personalized nutrition plan tailored to your own individual needs based on your blood work, and bio-markers from 34 different analyses. The results are combined with your entire health profile including height, weight, measurements, diseases, food allergies, medications and food likes/dislikes and tailored specifically to who you are and what you need. For more information contact me at tessanp@shaw.ca for your complimentary information session.

People following the Metabolic Balance® diet have seen improvements in:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Insulin resistance
  • Anxiety
  • Hormonal Issues
  • Struggle with sleep
  • Struggle with inflammation, aches and pains
  • Digestive issues like bloating, constipation or diarrhea
  • Struggle with infertility
  • Extreme food cravings and binge eating
  • Allergies and skin disorders
  • Liver and gall bladder issues

The Metabolic Balance® diet tackles these issues by examining your blood work markers, health history food preferences and your weight and measurements.

Every single plan has been developed by a doctor and nutritional therapists to be unique, and every person’s requirements have been tailored to their individual markers.

To read what the Metabolic Balance® diet science is saying read Tired of counting calories and obsessing about how much you eat? Consider focusing on what and how you eat instead!

Through the program, a naturally balanced insulin production is promoted, which is the “internal Key” to the body’s weight management system.  Not only is a healthy regulation of insulin a great way to lose weight and reduce cravings, but it also has a substantial effect on other hormonal and enzyme functions and production.

There is no calorie counting, point management, or percentage of fats, protein and carbs.

It’s an individualistic approach that helps your body “reset” its own natural metabolism by teaching the body what foods make it feel best, and what diet and lifestyle habits are leading to undesirable symptoms.

Once your body’s hormones are reset and balanced, your body will have a much easier time keeping the weight off, managing stress, keeping your blood sugars balanced, managing cravings, managing blood pressure, increasing your energy and reducing your inflammatory markers.

If you are wondering if the Metabolic Balance® diet is right for you contact me at tessanp@shaw.ca

Important small print you must read:
Disclaimer
The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

This post has been reproduced in part from an article published by  naughtynutrition. All permissions were granted from Metabolic Balance®

Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load. Is there a difference?

Have you ever had your blood sugar levels tested or heard about eating to balance blood sugar? Have you wondered about the science behind how foods affect blood sugar? Or more importantly, which foods affect your blood sugar more than others?

If so, this post is for you.

It’s all about the glycemic index and glycemic load. And it’s not boring, promise!

Have a read because you may want to pay attention to foods that are high on the glycemic index or high glycemic load. If you want to lose weight, blood sugar management is critical to control appetite, food binges and manage those crazy food cravings.

And if you’re at risk of blood sugar issues, pancreas conditions, or even diabetes this is IMPORTANT for you to know.

What is the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load?

Glycemic this and glycemic that. Does it matter?

You’ll notice that they both begin with “glycemic.” That’s one tip that they have to do with sugars and carbs. Not only how much sugar is in foods, but more importantly, how it affects your blood sugar levels.

In general, diets that are high on the glycemic index (GI) and high in glycemic load (GL), tend to increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

FUN FACT: Starches like those in potatoes and grains are digested into sugar; this is because starch is just a bunch of sugars linked together. Digestive enzymes break those bonds so that the sugars become free. Then those sugars affect your body the same way that eating sugary foods do.

Glycemic Index (“how fast”)

The most common of the two terms is “glycemic index” (GI).

As the name suggests, it “indexes” (or compares) the effect that different foods have on your blood sugar level. Then each food is given a score from 0 (no effect on blood sugar) to 100 (big effect on blood sugar). Foods that cause a fast increase in blood sugar have a high GI. That is because the sugar in them is quickly processed by your digestive system and absorbed into your blood. They cause a “spike” in your blood sugar.

So, you can probably guess that pure glucose is given a GI rating of 100. On the other hand, chickpeas are right down there at a GI of 10.

Regarding GI: low is anything under 55; moderate is 56-69, and 70+ is considered a high GI food.

Remember, this is a measure of how fast a carbohydrate containing food is digested and raised your blood sugar. It’s not a measure of the sugar content of the food.

How the carbohydrates in food affect your blood sugar level depend on other components of the food. Things like fiber and protein can slow the release of sugar into the bloodstream, and this can make even a high-sugar food, low on the GI scale.

So, lower GI foods are better at keeping your blood sugar levels stable because they don’t increase your blood sugar level as fast.

With the Metabolic Balance® plan, low GL carbohydrates alongside sufficient protein and fat reduce blood sugar spikes, helping with appetite control and resulting in the desired weight loss. Read more here.**

FUN FACT: Can you guess which food has a GI of higher than 100? (Think of something super-starchy) White potatoes! They have a GI of 111.

Glycemic Load (“how much”)

The glycemic load is different.

Glycemic load (GL) doesn’t take into account how quickly your blood sugar “spikes”, but it looks at how high that spike is. Basically, how much the food increases your blood sugar.

GL depends on two things. First, how much sugar is actually in the food. Second, how much of the food is typically eaten.

Low GL would be 0-10,  moderate GL would be 10-20, and high GL would 20+.

Example of GL and GI

 So, let’s compare average (120 g) servings of bananas and oranges:

Food GI Serving size (g) GL per serving
Banana, average 48 120 11
Oranges, average 45 120 5

Excerpt from: Harvard Health Publications, Glycemic index and glycemic load for 100+ foods

As you can see, the banana and orange have almost the same glycemic index.; this means they both raise your blood sugar in about the same amount of time.

But, the average banana raises the blood sugar twice as high (11) as the orange does (5). So, it contains more overall sugar than the same amount (120 g) of orange.

Of course, this is all relative. A GL of 11 is not high at all. Please keep eating whole fruits. 🙂

What does this all mean for your health?

Certain people should be aware of the effects that foods have on their blood sugar. People who have diabetes or pre-diabetes conditions like insulin resistance need to be aware of the glycemic index and glycemic load of foods they are eating regularly.

The GI and GL are just two factors to consider when it comes to blood sugar. Some high GI foods are pretty good for you but if you want to reduce the impact on your blood sugar, have them with a high-fiber or high-protein food.

Conclusion

If you have blood sugar imbalances or diabetes, you should probably be aware of the GI and GL of your food.

If you are at risk of diabetes or heart disease, you might try swapping out some higher GI/GL foods and replacing with lower GI/GL foods.

References:

http://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/glycemic_index_and_glycemic_load_for_100_foods

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/food-beverages/glycemic-index-glycemic-load

**Dr. Wolf Funfack, MD Metabolic Balance® Your Personalized Nutrition Roadmap-a natural approach to reaching your perfect body weight

the small print:

Disclaimer

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

The Gut-Brain Connection

Photo by rawpixel.com on Pexels.com

How To Feed Your Brain

 If there was ever a call for “digestive health,” this is it!

Yes, it’s true. Your gut is considered your “second brain.”

There is no denying it anymore.

And since my presentation on gut health, The Good Gut, Unraveling the mystery of the Microbiome, so much more information has come to light!    

With the new scientific discoveries about the vagus nerve, the enteric nervous system (ENS) or intrinsic nervous system, and the amazing influence your gut microbes can have, it’s no wonder what you eat feeds not only your body but can directly affect your brain.

What exactly is the “gut-brain connection.”

Well, it’s very complex, and to be honest, we’re still learning lots about it!

There seem to be multiple things working together.  Things like:

  • The vagus nerve that links the gut directly to the brain
  • The “enteric nervous system” (A.K.A. “second brain”) that helps the complex intricacies of digestion flow with little to no involvement from the actual brain;
  • The massive amount of neurotransmitters produced by the gut;
  • The huge part of the immune system that is in the gut, but can travel throughout the body; and,
  • The interactions and messages sent by the gut microbes.

This is complex. And pretty amazing, if you ask me.

I’ll briefly touch on these areas, and end off with a delicious recipe (of course!)

Vagus nerve

There is a nerve that runs directly from the gut to the brain.

And after reading this so far, you’ll probably get a sense of which direction 90% of the transmission is…

Not from your brain to your gut (which is what we used to think), but from your gut up to your brain!

The enteric nervous system and neurotransmitters

The gut lining has over 100 million nerve cells.  That’s more than the spinal cord!

 And that’s why it’s referred to as the “second brain.”

So, when you think about it, controlling the complex process of digestion (i.e. digestive enzymes, absorption of nutrients, the flow of food, etc.) should probably be done pretty “smartly”…don’t you think?

These nerves speak to each other, and to other cells via chemical messengers called “neurotransmitters.”

 In fact, many of the neurotransmitters that have a strong effect on our mood are made in the gut! e.g. a whopping 95% of serotonin is made in your gut, not in your brain!

And Serotonin is a key neurotransmitter that is responsible for regulating mood and cognition.

The immune system of the gut

Because eating and drinking is a huge portal where disease-causing critters can get into your body, it makes total sense that much of our defense system would be located there too, right? Seventy-five percent of our immune system is in our gut!

And you know that the immune cells can move throughout the entire body and cause inflammation just about anywhere, right?

Well, if they’re “activated” by something in the gut, they can potentially wreak havoc anywhere in the body. This includes the potential to cause inflammation in the brain.

Gut microbes

Your friendly neighbourhood gut residents. You have billions of those little guys happily living in your gut. And they do amazing things like help you digest certain foods, make certain vitamins, and even help regulate inflammation!

But more and more evidence is showing that changes in your gut microbiota can impact your mood, and even other, more serious, mental health issues.

How do these all work together for brain health?

The honest answer to how these things all work together is that we really don’t know just yet. More and more studies are being done to learn more.

But one thing is becoming clear. A healthy gut goes hand-in-hand with a healthy brain!

So, how do you feed your brain?

Of course, a variety of minimally-processed, nutrient-dense foods is required, because no nutrients work alone.

But two things that you may consider eating more of are fiber and omega-3 fats. Fiber in fruits, veggies, nuts & seeds, in particular prebiotic fibre containing foods, help to feed your awesome gut microbes.

And omega-3 fats (in fatty fish, walnuts, algae, and seeds like flax, chia, and hemp) are well-known inflammation-lowering brain boosters.

Here is one of my favourite overnight oat recipes, with Good Gut fibre, brain food omega-3

Blueberry Hemp Overnight Oats

Serves 2

1 cup blueberries (fresh or frozen)

1 cup oats (gluten-free)

1 cup almond milk

1 tablespoon chia seeds

2 tablespoons hemp seeds

½ teaspoon cinnamon

1 banana, sliced

¼ cup chopped walnuts

  1. Blend blueberries in the food processor until smooth, or leave them whole if prefferred
  2. Mix blueberries, oats, almond milk, chia seeds, hemp seeds in a bowl with a lid. Let set in fridge overnight.
  3. Split into two bowls and top with cinnamon, banana, and walnuts.

Serve & enjoy!

As an alternative, leave the blueberries whole, (no blender required or to clean!) and mix with the other ingredients.  Let set in fridge overnight.

Tip: Your gut microbes love to eat the fiber in the blueberries, oats, seeds, and nuts. Meanwhile, your brain loves the omega-3 fats in the seeds and nuts.

References:

http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/healthy_aging/healthy_body/the-brain-gut-connection

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-probiotics

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/fix-gut-fix-health

http://neurotrition.ca/blog/your-gut-bugs-what-they-eat-and-7-ways-feed-them

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

Adrenal Fatigue-What is it?

Adrenal fatigue is thought to be one of the (many) health issues that can be attributed to our high-stress lifestyles.

Because there is no widely accepted definitive test for adrenal fatigue, it’s still quite controversial.

Fatigue, cravings, inability to sleep, and mood swings are real.

And common.

Let’s dive into what we know about adrenal fatigue, and learn some ways to deal with it, including a non-food recipe (at the bottom).

You can also go here to get specific information on foods and lifestyle habits that support hormone health.

Adrenal Fatigue: What Is It?

Stressed? Tired? Craving sugar? Can’t sleep?

All of these can be related to the constant stress we feel in our lives. We know that stress can have a huge impact on our health and wellness. And, since your adrenal glands produce stress hormones, adrenal fatigue (or “HPA Axis Dysregulation,”) is a popular theme lately.

Your adrenal glands look like walnuts that live on top of both of your kidneys. These important glands produce many hormones, including stress hormones.

But what happens when they become “overworked?”

You’ve heard of “adrenaline junkies,” right?

Adrenaline and cortisol are the stress hormones that give you the commonly known adrenaline rush; when you’re totally alert and living in the moment. This feeling is known as your body’s “fight or flight” response.

Some people (perhaps you?) just love that intense feeling.

The release of hormones in the fight or flight response is your body’s normal reaction to stress.  Stress can sometimes be positive, like when it helps you swerve and prevent a crash.

After a short time, the flight or flight response dissipates, your body goes back to normal, and all is good.

But what would happen if you felt constant stress? Like all day, every day? Like “chronic” stress?

It wouldn’t feel like an awesome (once-in-a-while) “rush,” anymore would it?

And what do you think happens to your poor adrenal glands when they’re constantly working?

They’d get fatigued, right?

Do I have adrenal fatigue?

When your adrenal glands start getting tired of secreting stress hormones day in and out, you can start getting other symptoms.

Symptoms like fatigue, difficulty sleeping, mood swings, weight loss or gain, joint pain, sugar cravings, even frequent infections like colds and the flu are signs that your adrenals are overworked.

First off, I have to tell you that there aren’t medically accepted blood tests for adrenal fatigue. In fact, it’s not recognized by most medical professionals until the point when your adrenals are so fatigued they almost stop working. At that point, the official diagnoses of “Adrenal Insufficiency” or “Addison’s Disease” may apply.

However, if you do have symptoms, you should see your doctor to rule out other conditions. He or she may even be open to discussing adrenal fatigue, or at the very least, wellness strategies that can help to reduce your stress (and symptoms).

You can read here for wellness strategies that support the adrenal glands.

What to do if I have these symptoms?

There are many actions you can take to reduce your stress and improve your health and energy levels.

Ideally, if you think stress is starting to burn you out, stress reduction is key. There are tons of ideas how you can reduce your stress. My favourites are meditation, walking in nature, light exercise, more sleep, or taking a bath.

Of course, I also recommend reducing sugar and processed food intake and eating more fruits and vegetables. Better nutrition can only help your body. So go ahead and do it.

Yes, you can eat your way to balanced hormones. You can learn more about that here.

Conclusion

Your adrenal glands produce hormones in response to stress. After long-term daily stress, they may get tired.

Adrenal fatigue is a controversial disease that doesn’t have a true diagnostic test, nor specific telltale symptoms.

The most important thing you can do is to get tested to rule out other potential conditions. You can also try stress reduction techniques like meditation, walks in nature, light exercise, more sleep, or even a lovely bath.

Recipe (Stress-reducing bath salt): Lavender Bath Salts

Per bath

2 cups epsom salts

10 drops lavender essential oil

As you’re running your warm bath water, add ingredients to the tub. Mix until dissolved

Enjoy your stress-reducing bath!

Tip: You can add a tablespoon of dried lavender flowers.

References: Available on request

Yep, you gotta read the small print, its important:

Disclaimer

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

Tired of counting calories and obsessing about how much you eat? Consider focusing on this instead!

There is no shortage of health information available on the internet, in the media, and from well-meaning family and friends.

But some of that information may be doing you more harm than good.

In this post I spill the beans about some common healthy eating myths and what matters just as much or even more than “how much” you eat.

Learn why “what” you eat and “how” you eat it are important things to consider.  HINT:  Smoothies should be considered “meals” not snacks or drinks.

Oh my gosh – nutrition and diet info is everywhere!

And each expert and association tries to lead you in their direction because they know best and their advice is going to help you.  Right?

Well, maybe…

Everyone has heard (and maybe lived through) the intense focus on how much you eat.  This has gotten way too much attention because while this does affect your weight and energy level, it’s certainly not the “holy grail” of health.

Let’s focus a bit more on the often overlooked (and proven) benefits of what you eat and drink and how you eat and drink it.

Another hint: the Metabolic Balance® plan doesn’t take calories into consideration yet people on the plan lose weight, keep it off and experience significant health improvements. 

In a 2010 observational study the Metabolic Balance® diet program resulted in long-term improvements in health status and most importantly, health-related quality of life (HRQOL).  It also ranked highly in adherence, because people liked the individually designed nutrition plans and found them easy to stick to. Click the link to read the study https://www.hindawi.com/journals/jnme/2010/197656/

What you eat and drink

The “calories in, calories out” philosophy (i.e. how much you eat) is being drowned out with research on other factors that may be just as important.

Don’t get me wrong limiting calories, carbs or fat can certainly help you lose weight but that’s simply not the only factor for long-term weight loss and maximum energy for everyone.

When the intense focus on how much we ate didn’t work in the long-run it wasn’t really a surprise. We kinda knew that already, didn’t we?

You can certainly still continue to count your calories, carbs, and fat but don’t forget to also pay attention to what you eat.

Ideally, you need a varied diet full of minimally-processed foods (i.e. fewer “packaged” “ready-to-eat” foods).  This simple concept is paramount for weight loss, energy, and overall health and wellness.

Every day this is what you should aim for:

  • A colourful array of fruits and veggies at almost every meal and snack. You need the fiber, antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals.
  • Enough protein. Making sure you get all of those essential amino acids (bonus: eating protein can increase your metabolism). The Metabolic Balance® program calculates the exact ratio of protein required to keep you full and stave off hunger. If you are wondering if this program is right for you contact me at any time at tessanp@shaw.ca
  • Healthy fats and oils (never “hydrogenated” ones). There is a reason some fatty acids are called “essential” – you need them as building blocks for your hormones and brain as well as to be able to absorb essential fat-soluble vitamins from your healthy salads and vegetables.  Use extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil, eat your organic egg yolks, get grass-fed meats and Omega 3 rich fish, nuts and seeds when possible.  You don’t need to overdo it here.  Just make sure you’re getting some high-quality fats.

How you eat and drink

Also pay attention to how you eat and drink.

Studies are definitely showing that this has more of an impact than we previously thought.

Are you rushed, not properly chewing your food, and possibly suffering from gastrointestinal issues? Do you drink your food?

When it comes to how you eat let’s first look at “mindful eating”.

Mindful eating means to take smaller bites, eat slowly, chew thoroughly, and savour every bite.  Notice and appreciate the smell, taste and texture.  Breathe.

This gives your digestive system the hint to prepare for digestion and to secrete necessary enzymes.

This can also help with weight loss because eating slower often means eating less.  Did you know that it takes about 20 minutes for your brain to know that your stomach is full?

Thought so!

We also know that more thoroughly chewed food is easier to digest and it makes it easier to absorb all of those essential nutrients.

And don’t forget about drinking your food.

Yes, smoothies can be healthy and a fabulously easy and tasty way to get in some fruits and veggies (hello leafy greens!) but drinking too much food can contribute to a weight problem and feelings of sluggishness.

Don’t get me wrong a green smoothie can make an amazingly nutrient-dense meal and is way better than stopping for convenient junk food – just consider a large smoothie to be a full meal not a snack.  And don’t gulp it down too fast.

If your smoothies don’t fill you up like a full meal does try adding in a spoon of fiber like ground flax or chia seeds.

Summary

Consider not only how much you eat but also what and how you eat it.

Remember, you are unique and that’s where the Metabolic Balance® program shines. It is a complete nutrition program that is backed by research and managed by physicians and nutritional scientists.

Contact me at tessanp@shaw.ca for more information.

 

 

References:

http://summertomato.com/wisdom-wednesday-salad-dressing-is-your-friend

https://authoritynutrition.com/20-reasons-you-are-not-losing-weight/

http://summertomato.com/the-science-behind-mindful-eating-what-happens-to-your-body-during-a-mindful-meal

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/nut-and-seed-products/3061/2

 

 

Important small print you must read:
Disclaimer
The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you never overeat at meals (ever!) you’re not going to need these great tips

We all do it. Sometimes the amazing aroma and delicious flavour gets the best of us.  Especially if we’re a bit on the hungry (or hangry) side.
I’m talking about overeating at meals.  This can have a big impact on our weight, energy levels, and overall health and well being.  Of course our body needs food to fuel it and we often (usually, right) eat amazingly healthy foods.
It is way too easy (and common) to indulge during holiday feasts. But it doesn’t always stop there. Sometimes we overeat on regular days.  Or at regular meals.  Or All. The. Time.
In this post I’m going to give you three solid tips for preventing that from happening.  Seriously! If you can make these things a regular habit and part of your daily routine you’ve got one up on the overeating cravings.
And here’s a secret, it’s not about willpower it’s about habits.
If you want more help after reading these great tips the Metabolic Plan® can help control the cravings and desire to overeat with a customized nutrition plan based on your unique body chemistry.
For more information send me an email at tessanp@shaw.ca or click on the weight loss tab in this website.
Now, read on for three ways to avoid overeating at meals
(Psst, turn these into habits and ditch the willpower!)

Tip #1: Start with some water

When your stomach is growling and you smell amazingly delicious food it’s too easy to fill a plate (or grab some samples with your bare hands) and dive into the food.

Something that I have a tendency to do is what I call “eat before I eat”.  As I’m preparing dinner I’ll snack on a little (or a lot) of something.  Not good because its distracted eating.  You’ll read more on how to get a grip on that when you get to Tip #2.

But did you know that it’s possible to sometimes confuse the feeling of thirst with that of hunger?  Your stomach may actually be craving a big glass of water rather than a feast.

Some studies have shown that drinking a glass or two of water before a meal can help reduce the amount of food eaten.  And this super-simple tip may even help with weight loss (…just sayin’).

Not only will the water start to fill up your stomach before you get to the buffet,  leaving less room for the feast but drinking enough water has been shown to slightly increase your metabolism. Also, I find avoiding buffets to be one of the best antidotes to over eating!

Tip #2: Try eating “mindfully”

You’ve heard of mindfulness, but have you applied that to your eating habits?

This can totally help you avoid overeating as well as having the added bonus of helping your digestion.

Just as being mindful when you meditate helps to focus your attention on your breathing and the present moment being mindful when you eat helps to focus your attention on your meal.

Do this by taking smaller bites, eating more slowly, chewing more thoroughly, and savouring every mouthful.  Notice and appreciate the smell, taste and texture.  Breathe.

This can help prevent overeating because eating slower often means eating less.

When you eat quickly you can easily overeat because it takes about 20 minutes for your brain to know that your stomach is full.

So take your time, pay attention to your food and enjoy every bite.

Bonus tip: Eat at a table (not in front of the screen), off of a small plate, and put your fork down between bites.

Tip #3: Start with the salad or a broth based vegetable soup

You may be yearning for that rich, creamy main dish.

But don’t start there.

(Don’t worry, you can have some…just after you’ve eaten your soup or salad).

Veggies are a great way to start any meal because they’re full of not only vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, and health-promoting phytochemicals but they also have some secret satiety weapons: fiber and water.

Fiber and water are known to help fill you up and make you feel fuller.  They’re “satiating”.

And these secret weapons are great to have on your side when you’re about to indulge in a large meal.

So have:

  • your glass of water
  • eat mindfully
  • and start with your soup or salad

This will help avoid overeating at meals.  Simple yet proven effective.

 

References:

https://authoritynutrition.com/7-health-benefits-of-water/

http://summertomato.com/the-science-behind-mindful-eating-what-happens-to-your-body-during-a-mindful-meal

 

 

 

 

Important small print you must read:
Disclaimer
The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

 

Personalized Nutrition

There’s a lot of talk, and a lot of books out there on personalized nutrition, those foods that contain the right combination and amounts of nutrients designed just for you.

Imagine knowing exactly what foods to eat to optimize your health and prevent disease! I haven’t seen one of those diets yet, but there’s plenty of information on what we should be eating to stay healthy, some of it based on science and much of it based on anecdotal evidence and a heavy dose of bias.  There are so many variables that affect the way each individual responds to food but I do believe the next frontier in nutrition will be personalized nutrition.

This is where the metabolic balance® program shines, a personalized nutrition plan based on a person’s unique body chemistry by measuring 30 plus blood markers and taking into consideration food preferences and allergies.  Pretty unique.  Read what one of my clients has to say about her experience with the metabolic balance program:

The metabolic balance ® program has truly changed my life and done absolute wonders for my confidence!  I have tried and failed at many diets.  I just could not lose that 20 pounds and keep it off; I always gained back the weight.  On the metabolic balance® program not only have I lost the excess weight but have managed to keep it off for almost a year!

Better yet, I know that I will keep the weight off because I use the principles of the plan and the knowledge I gained about food and health from my coach, Tessa, who supported and guided me along the way.

I loved the fact that the plan provided me with a list of foods that are right for my body, that I purchase and cook for myself.  With other plans using their foods, I was left on my own when off their foods, and having to then shop for myself, not knowing really what to buy.  This plan gave me the shopping list for the rest of my life.  With Tessa’s assistance I can now add to this shopping list with confidence in what I am buying.    

The plan was easy to follow and fit perfectly into my lifestyle. It was also a bonus that I had zero cravings and was not hungry.  I really believe that the metabolic balance customized nutrition program resets the metabolism and makes it so much easier to maintain my ideal body weight.

Thank you metabolic balance®!

To learn more about the metabolic balance® program and how it can help you achieve your health goals contact me at tessanp@shaw.ca

There is still time to take advantage of the special pricing available for the month of April.  To learn more contact me at tessanp@shaw.ca

 

 

Important small print you must read:
Disclaimer
The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.