Tag Archives: diabetes

Is the Keto diet for you?

Photo by bruce mars on Pexels.com

Ketogenic Diet 101

I regularly get asked if the Metabolic Balance® program is based on the Ketogenic diet.  The answer is no. However, it’s my preferred program for helping people lose weight and keep it off and in many cases see improvements in certain health conditions.  Clients regularly describe how the program has improved their quality of life, in fact there is a scientific study of the program to prove that.

You can read more about the Metabolic Balance® method here and the reasons why I chose it.

However, back to the Keto diet which is what this post is about. What exactly is the ketogenic diet? It is a very low carb, moderate protein, very high-fat diet.

It has recently gained a lot of popularity in the wellness sphere because of some of its health benefits.

A ketogenic diet has been shown to help some people lose weight (yes, even with high fat). It can also help improve certain health conditions, like epilepsy in children.

Read on for some of the lowdown on how it reprograms your metabolism (for “ketosis”), and whether or not it’s something for you to consider.

What is “ketosis?”

Carbs (sugars & starches) are the preferred fuel for your brain and muscles. They use carbs first, whenever they’re available.

This is why maintaining stable blood sugar can affect your attention, mood, and energy level.

However, when very low amounts of carbs are available for fuel, your body starts making compounds known as “ketones.” These are your body’s “backup fuel.” And your body makes them from fat.

Ketogenic literally means “the generation of ketones.”

After a while being on a diet very low in carbs, your blood level of ketones increases. This is the metabolic state known as “ketosis.” It’s the same process that your body goes through if you’ve fasted for 72 hours and depleted your supply of carbs as fuel. That’s the trigger for turning fat into ketones.

Pro Tip: “Ketosis” from a ketogenic diet is not the same thing as the dangerous condition known as “ketoacidosis.”

Ketogenic diet for weight loss

With a high fat intake, it may be surprising to know that studies show that a ketogenic diet is effective for weight loss.

But it’s true!

It can also have better results than low-fat diets. At least one study showed that people lost 2.2 times more weight on a ketogenic diet than those on low-fat or calorie-controlled diets.

How is this possible?

Eating all that fat and protein is filling! It helps release satiety hormones that tell us that we’re full and satisfied, and we don’t need to eat anymore. Many people don’t need to count calories or track food intake, as they do with low-fat or calorie-controlled diets.

So, by eating enough fat and protein to go into “ketosis,” you can actually feel fuller and eat less food overall. Of course, this can help with weight loss.

Ketogenic diet for improved health

Some studies show other health benefits of the ketogenic diet.

As you can imagine, having very low levels of carbs can help reduce blood sugar and insulin issues.

One study showed improved blood triglycerides (fat) and cholesterol numbers. Others show lower blood sugar levels, and even up to 75% improvement in insulin sensitivity.

Several studies show reduced seizures in children who follow a ketogenic diet.

Changing your metabolism has widespread health effects. And this can be beneficial for some people.

How to do the ketogenic diet

Not everyone should go on a ketogenic diet. Make sure you speak with a trained healthcare practitioner before you try it. It can have side effects, including the infamous “keto flu.”

The ketogenic diet involves getting 60-75% of your calories from fat, 20-35% from protein, and just 5% from carbs. Many people find it quite restrictive and are unable to stay on it for a long time.

The foods to focus on for a ketogenic diet are meat, fatty fish, eggs, nuts, seeds, healthy oils, avocados, and low-carb vegetables (cucumber, celery, peppers, zucchini, leafy greens, etc.).

The main thing to avoid are foods that are high in carbs. This can be very confusing and complicated for people. Some of the more obvious foods include sugary, processed and refined foods; desserts, grains,rice, fruit, legumes, starchy vegetables (think potatoes), alcohol and “diet foods.”

And because of the limits on fruit and starchy vegetables, many people on the ketogenic diet likely need to take supplements. This is because, in addition to their sugar and starch, fruits and starchy veggies are a great source of vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients. So, if you’re cutting those foods out, you still need to give your body those nutrients. And often, it means needing supplements.

Conclusion

The ketogenic diet is very popular these days. It can be helpful for weight loss, and other health conditions.

It’s not for everyone, so make sure you check with a knowledgeable practitioner before you begin.

References:

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/ketogenic-diet

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/ketogenic-diet-101

http://neurotrition.ca/blog/going-keto-what-science-saying-3-safe-ways-do-it

Disclaimer

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

A Blood work road map to your health goals

Here’s exactly how the Metabolic Balance® Diet will get you long term results.

Just think about it.

What’s the first thing you do when you think that something is wrong with your body?

You most likely go to the doctor.

And when you do go, they usually recommend blood work to make sure your blood markers are within normal ranges.

Fatigue, lack of motivation or concentration, weight loss, weight gain, dizziness, aches and pains…..the symptoms can be vast, so the first response to unexplained symptoms by most medical professionals is blood work.

Now, imagine instead of the doctor just prescribing NSAIDs or Beta blockers in response to your blood work, they decide to dive a little deeper.

For example, they took a lifestyle and dietary intake form, a complete medical history and mapped out changes that you could make within your lifestyle, as well as mapped out the foods that suit your specific biological needs.

Imagine you received a personalized health plan that could help to orchestrate the biochemical changes needed to help you lose weight and feel amazing, and that this plan knew exactly what you needed because it knew you from the inside out.

Well, that’s exactly what Metabolic Balance® diet is, and why it gets results every time.

What is the Metabolic Balance® diet and is it right for me?

The Metabolic Balance® diet is a personalized nutrition plan tailored to your own individual needs based on your blood work, and bio-markers from 34 different analyses. The results are combined with your entire health profile including height, weight, measurements, diseases, food allergies, medications and food likes/dislikes and tailored specifically to who you are and what you need. For more information contact me at tessanp@shaw.ca for your complimentary information session.

People following the Metabolic Balance® diet have seen improvements in:

  • Extreme fatigue
  • High blood pressure
  • Diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Insulin resistance
  • Anxiety
  • Hormonal Issues
  • Struggle with sleep
  • Struggle with inflammation, aches and pains
  • Digestive issues like bloating, constipation or diarrhea
  • Struggle with infertility
  • Extreme food cravings and binge eating
  • Allergies and skin disorders
  • Liver and gall bladder issues

The Metabolic Balance® diet tackles these issues by examining your blood work markers, health history food preferences and your weight and measurements.

Every single plan has been developed by a doctor and nutritional therapists to be unique, and every person’s requirements have been tailored to their individual markers.

To read what the Metabolic Balance® diet science is saying read Tired of counting calories and obsessing about how much you eat? Consider focusing on what and how you eat instead!

Through the program, a naturally balanced insulin production is promoted, which is the “internal Key” to the body’s weight management system.  Not only is a healthy regulation of insulin a great way to lose weight and reduce cravings, but it also has a substantial effect on other hormonal and enzyme functions and production.

There is no calorie counting, point management, or percentage of fats, protein and carbs.

It’s an individualistic approach that helps your body “reset” its own natural metabolism by teaching the body what foods make it feel best, and what diet and lifestyle habits are leading to undesirable symptoms.

Once your body’s hormones are reset and balanced, your body will have a much easier time keeping the weight off, managing stress, keeping your blood sugars balanced, managing cravings, managing blood pressure, increasing your energy and reducing your inflammatory markers.

If you are wondering if the Metabolic Balance® diet is right for you contact me at tessanp@shaw.ca

Important small print you must read:
Disclaimer
The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

This post has been reproduced in part from an article published by  naughtynutrition. All permissions were granted from Metabolic Balance®

Glycemic Index, Glycemic Load. Is there a difference?

Have you ever had your blood sugar levels tested or heard about eating to balance blood sugar? Have you wondered about the science behind how foods affect blood sugar? Or more importantly, which foods affect your blood sugar more than others?

If so, this post is for you.

It’s all about the glycemic index and glycemic load. And it’s not boring, promise!

Have a read because you may want to pay attention to foods that are high on the glycemic index or high glycemic load. If you want to lose weight, blood sugar management is critical to control appetite, food binges and manage those crazy food cravings.

And if you’re at risk of blood sugar issues, pancreas conditions, or even diabetes this is IMPORTANT for you to know.

What is the Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load?

Glycemic this and glycemic that. Does it matter?

You’ll notice that they both begin with “glycemic.” That’s one tip that they have to do with sugars and carbs. Not only how much sugar is in foods, but more importantly, how it affects your blood sugar levels.

In general, diets that are high on the glycemic index (GI) and high in glycemic load (GL), tend to increase the risk of diabetes and heart disease.

FUN FACT: Starches like those in potatoes and grains are digested into sugar; this is because starch is just a bunch of sugars linked together. Digestive enzymes break those bonds so that the sugars become free. Then those sugars affect your body the same way that eating sugary foods do.

Glycemic Index (“how fast”)

The most common of the two terms is “glycemic index” (GI).

As the name suggests, it “indexes” (or compares) the effect that different foods have on your blood sugar level. Then each food is given a score from 0 (no effect on blood sugar) to 100 (big effect on blood sugar). Foods that cause a fast increase in blood sugar have a high GI. That is because the sugar in them is quickly processed by your digestive system and absorbed into your blood. They cause a “spike” in your blood sugar.

So, you can probably guess that pure glucose is given a GI rating of 100. On the other hand, chickpeas are right down there at a GI of 10.

Regarding GI: low is anything under 55; moderate is 56-69, and 70+ is considered a high GI food.

Remember, this is a measure of how fast a carbohydrate containing food is digested and raised your blood sugar. It’s not a measure of the sugar content of the food.

How the carbohydrates in food affect your blood sugar level depend on other components of the food. Things like fiber and protein can slow the release of sugar into the bloodstream, and this can make even a high-sugar food, low on the GI scale.

So, lower GI foods are better at keeping your blood sugar levels stable because they don’t increase your blood sugar level as fast.

With the Metabolic Balance® plan, low GL carbohydrates alongside sufficient protein and fat reduce blood sugar spikes, helping with appetite control and resulting in the desired weight loss. Read more here.**

FUN FACT: Can you guess which food has a GI of higher than 100? (Think of something super-starchy) White potatoes! They have a GI of 111.

Glycemic Load (“how much”)

The glycemic load is different.

Glycemic load (GL) doesn’t take into account how quickly your blood sugar “spikes”, but it looks at how high that spike is. Basically, how much the food increases your blood sugar.

GL depends on two things. First, how much sugar is actually in the food. Second, how much of the food is typically eaten.

Low GL would be 0-10,  moderate GL would be 10-20, and high GL would 20+.

Example of GL and GI

 So, let’s compare average (120 g) servings of bananas and oranges:

Food GI Serving size (g) GL per serving
Banana, average 48 120 11
Oranges, average 45 120 5

Excerpt from: Harvard Health Publications, Glycemic index and glycemic load for 100+ foods

As you can see, the banana and orange have almost the same glycemic index.; this means they both raise your blood sugar in about the same amount of time.

But, the average banana raises the blood sugar twice as high (11) as the orange does (5). So, it contains more overall sugar than the same amount (120 g) of orange.

Of course, this is all relative. A GL of 11 is not high at all. Please keep eating whole fruits. 🙂

What does this all mean for your health?

Certain people should be aware of the effects that foods have on their blood sugar. People who have diabetes or pre-diabetes conditions like insulin resistance need to be aware of the glycemic index and glycemic load of foods they are eating regularly.

The GI and GL are just two factors to consider when it comes to blood sugar. Some high GI foods are pretty good for you but if you want to reduce the impact on your blood sugar, have them with a high-fiber or high-protein food.

Conclusion

If you have blood sugar imbalances or diabetes, you should probably be aware of the GI and GL of your food.

If you are at risk of diabetes or heart disease, you might try swapping out some higher GI/GL foods and replacing with lower GI/GL foods.

References:

http://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/glycemic_index_and_glycemic_load_for_100_foods

http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/food-beverages/glycemic-index-glycemic-load

**Dr. Wolf Funfack, MD Metabolic Balance® Your Personalized Nutrition Roadmap-a natural approach to reaching your perfect body weight

the small print:

Disclaimer

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.