Tag Archives: lose weight

How Much Sugar is Too Much?

Photo by Karley Saagi on Pexels.com
How much sugar is too much?

Everyone’s talking about how bad sugar is for you. There are even entire documentaries on the topic. The amount of information in the “health waves” can be crazy sometimes.

Sugar is not a health food, as you know. And “added sugars” (ones that are not naturally found in whole foods like fruit) are particularly bad. They’re not only bad for diabetes; but, also for your waistline, mood, and energy levels.

So let’s look at sugar more objectively, shall we? Is there a good balance that can be found? (Spoiler alert: It may not be what you think.)

Plus, I have a fabulous dessert recipe for those times you crave the white stuff (and it doesn’t even have any white stuff in it!).

How Much Sugar is Too Much?

It’s official! Organizations and governments are (finally) declaring a maximum amount of daily sugar intake.

While this is a step forward, there are still a few problems. One – they don’t all agree with each other. And, two, I don’t necessarily agree with them either.

We all know sugar is NOT a health food. It isn’t full of nutrition, and excess consumption is not associated with great health.

The problem is that sugar is everywhere. It’s naturally occurring. It’s also added to just about every processed food there is. And this “added sugar” is a factor in many chronic diseases we see today. Sugar is inflammatory. Too much is associated with weight gain, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and cavities. Too much sugar is a huge health risk, no matter how you look at it.

So let’s talk about how much sugar is “too much.”

Added sugar vs. naturally occurring sugar. What do some of the officials say?

Before we talk about the “official” numbers (and why I don’t agree with them), you need to know the difference between “added” sugar and “naturally occurring” sugar.

Fruit and other healthy whole foods contain sugar. They also contain water, fiber, vitamins, minerals, and other phytochemicals. They are good for you. Eating fruits and vegetables is a well-proven way to reduce your risks of many chronic diseases.

“Added sugars,” on the other hand, are concerning. In 2013, the American Heart Association calculated that about 25,000 deaths per year were due to sweetened beverages. “Added sugars” are also in baked goods, candies, soups, sauces and other processed foods. You can find sugar on the ingredient list as many names, often ending in “-ose.” These include glucose, fructose, sucrose, etc.

There’s a download here that you may find helpful when identifying the different sugars.

So, “Total sugars” = “Naturally occurring sugars” + “Added sugars.”

The “official” change is the new Nutrition Facts tables. You may remember that in Canada and the USA, they declare the amount of sugar, but don’t give it a %DV (% daily value); this means, they’ve never had a “benchmark” maximum daily value to use. They haven’t declared how much is too much. Now, both countries are implementing a %DV for sugar.

In Canada, the %DV is based on 100 g/day of total sugar. You may remember we discussed these numbers at my recent presentation on understanding food labels and the new Canada food guide.

Unfortunately, this number is large because it includes both naturally occurring and added sugars. The %DV is in-line with the Canadian Heart & Stroke Foundation’s recommendations of no more than 90 g of total sugars per day.

In 2008, the average daily total sugar intake in the USA was 76.7 grams per day; this is less than these two benchmarks. Yet, it doesn’t seem that people are getting healthier.  I’d argue that 100 g per day total sugar is still too high.

In the USA, the labels are changing too. They are not declaring “total” sugars but will differentiate between naturally occurring and added sugars. They have decided on a maximum of 50 g of “added” sugars each day. Unfortunately, this is still more than the American Heart Association’s recommended maximum of 24 g/day added sugar for women, and 36 g/day added sugar for men.

What is a better daily sugar goal?

While these official numbers are a step in the right direction, they’re not what I would recommend.

For one thing, I’d ditch as many processed food as possible, regardless of their sugar content. There are a ton of studies that show that processed foods are bad for your health. Period. I wouldn’t recommend eating your “daily value” of sugar from sweetened processed foods. I don’t recommend even 50 g of “added” sugar per day. Get your sugar from whole, unprocessed fruits first.

Second, you don’t even need to max out your daily sugar intake. I promise! Try to reduce your sugar intake below these “official” amounts for an even better goal.

Tips to reduce your sugar intake

Here are some of my most popular recommendations to reduce your sugar intake, so you don’t get too much:

  • Reduce (or eliminate) sugar-sweetened beverages; this includes soda pop, sweetened coffee/tea, sports drinks, etc. Instead, have fruit-infused water. Or try drinking your coffee/tea “black” or with a touch of cinnamon or vanilla instead.
  • Reduce (or eliminate) your desserts and baked goods and bake your own instead. You can easily reduce the sugar in a recipe by half. Or try my delicious (no added sugar) dessert recipe below.
  • Instead of a granola bar (or other sugary snack), try fruit, a handful of nuts, or veggies with hummus. These are easy grab-and-go snacks if you prepare them in a “to-go” container the night before.

Let me know in the comments your favorite tips to reduce your sugar intake!

Recipe (No added sugar): Frosty

Serves 1

¾ cup almond milk (unsweetened)

½ tsp vanilla extract

1 tbsp cocoa powder (unsweetened)

½ banana, frozen

Ice cubes

Instructions

Add everything into a blender except ice. Blend.

Add a handful of ice cubes and pulse until thick and ice is blended.

Serve & enjoy!

Tip: Double the recipe to share.

References:

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-labelling-changes.html?_ga=2.256456139.1337838755.1500915116-364691916.1498677123

https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm385663.htm#images

http://www.heartandstroke.ca/get-healthy/healthy-eating/reduce-sugar

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/HealthyEating/Nutrition/Added-Sugars_UCM_305858_Article.jsp#.WXYtbYjys2w

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/how-much-sugar-per-day

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/truth-about-sugar

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/how-to-break-the-sugar-habit-and-help-your-health-in-the-process

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/how-to-spot-and-avoid-added-sugar

http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/eating-too-much-added-sugar-increases-the-risk-of-dying-with-heart-disease-201402067021

Disclaimer

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your diet, taking supplements or making any changes to your health care regimen.

I believed this

Prefer to listen. You can do that right here

I thought it was all about calories. Calories in and calories out. Well, there is some validity behind that. But what happens when weight gain seems to be your new best friend?

That’s exactly what happened to me and then I found another way. One that worked. The Metabolic Balance ® Method.

The 4 phase system resets your metabolism, balances hormones and blasts body fat! All without torturous exercise, prescribed injections, counting points and counting calories

This unique 4 phase systems lays it all out for you-you don’t even have to decide what foods to eat-the system does it for you! It’s intuitive and brilliant.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Read on to learn more or watch this quick video

Losing weight and keeping it off is hard, there’s no point denying it. However there is a path forward that helps us deal with the complex changes that go on in the body throughout the different stages of life, including a change in our health status and life habits, and when our hormones run amok. And, by the way this happens to both men (yes men) and women.

For most of us finding a long-term solution for maintaining a health weight is like finding a needle in a haystack…extremely difficult! The good news is, provided three key factors occur, you can develop an enjoyable lifestyle that easily maintains your weight. These three things are:

  • Reset your sense of taste, smell, appetite and fullness,
  • Listen to internal signals rather than external signals,
  • Shift naturally your perception of food,

Research and experience show that our senses are indeed affected by what we eat. Developing a sensible and personal nutrition lifestyle is Metabolic Balance’s ® specialty!

The foundation of the Metabolic Balance ® method is it’s unique capability to develop a truly personalized nutrition plan based upon an in-depth analysis of your unique blood values, medical history and personal likes and dislikes.

Your personalized nutrition plan acts as a “road map”, indicating exactly which natural foods you should eat in order to orchestrate the biochemical changes needed for reaching your desirable weight and health goals.

Reset your metabolism, reset your senses, reset your body

Metabolic Balance ® has served over one million people. So If you want to feel your best and lose some weight, now is the time to tap into my insight and learn more. Contact me by email tessanp@shaw.ca Watch and listen here

Read about personal experiences here

Could this be program be for you? This program requires the willingness to try new foods, integrate new habits, being open to change and new concepts. The old way of losing weight has proven to be a bust.

There is no working out for 16 days other than daily walks and gentle stretching.

If you are looking for a quick fix, this plan is definitely not for you .

Still want to know more? Contact me @ tessanp@shaw.ca

Disclaimer

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.

Medical Disclaimer: metabolic balance® is not a medically supervised program. The metabolic balance® plan and system is designed to help healthy individuals lose weight and achieve a healthier lifestyle. It is a recommended dietary program only and in no way represents a medical treatment or medical advice. The program does not constitute a medical product or service and does not diagnose or treat any medical condition or disease. It does not accommodate for physical or medical conditions, food allergies or the taking of any medications. All medical conditions and your current health status should be discussed with your physician prior to beginning this, or any other, weight loss program.