Tag Archives: constipation

Signs you need a cleanse

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There are times when I feel like I want to give my body a break. This happens when I’ve over indulged in food (I love to eat it ), and wine.  Living in wine country will do that!  You’ve probably had this experience yourself at one time or another.

The idea of a body refresh sounds about perfect right now, you can get it here or read on about signs and symptoms of overload and get the download that includes a symptoms checker.

What happens when we stray, or don’t give our body the nutrients it needs, we suffer the consequences.  What does that feel like? Do any of these symptoms sound familiar: sluggish digestion, fatigue, skin break outs, gas and bloating, interrupted sleep, headaches.

Find out about the different symptoms by clicking on the link and checking off the symptoms that apply to you which may indicate it’s time to give yourself some TLC. get the hand out here .

Do detox diets and cleanses really work? Actually, I don’t know. What I know is that detoxing and cleanses are common buzz words and it seems most everyone I come in contact with has been on a detox, just finishing a detox, or going on a detox.

I definitely have an opinion about it but I would rather focus on what I know for sure: The liver kidneys, lungs, digestive system and skin are the most effective tools for detoxification not some 10 day cleansing kit, tea or special diet.

Before you spend your hard earned money on your next detox kit, “skinny” tea, juice cleanse or special diet remember this, your body does a beautiful job of detoxing all on its own!

It’s possible for our natural detoxification systems to become overburdened for a number of reasons including poor lifestyle choices, exposure to toxic chemicals, medications, even stress can produce more chemicals that need to be detoxed.

For most of us, the natural reaction is to reduce consumption.  Now that’s a good plan, but with my knowledge in nutrition and the body’s amazing ability to detoxify and cleanse, I know there’s more to it than simply “cutting back.”

And given that the liver is the workhorse when it comes to detoxification, I am inspired to boost the process by adding specific nutrients; those foods and nutrients that boost our body’s ability to detoxify.

That’s what my 7 day body refresh is all about. A way to get your body back in balance, so you can feel lighter and more energized in a few short days. You can get it here.

What are your thoughts on detoxification kits and cleanses?

Medical Disclaimer The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your diet, taking supplements or making any changes to your health care regimen

Dairy Intolerance (Lactose, Casein and Whey)

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Do you have a dairy intolerance? An allergy? What’s the difference? How can you even tell?

And if you do, what should you do about it?

Don’t worry – I have you covered in my newest post.

Having a food intolerance is not fun. It can cause abdominal pain, discomfort, and nausea. It also causes embarrassing symptoms like flatulence and diarrhea. Other symptoms linked to food intolerances include muscle or joint pain, headaches, exhaustion, and even skin symptoms like rashes and eczema.

Dairy is just one of those foods that many people seem to be intolerant of. Let’s talk about the main components of milk that people react to: lactose, casein, and whey.

Milk sugar (lactose) intolerance

It’s estimated that up to 75% of adults are lactose intolerant. Lactose is the carbohydrate “milk sugar” naturally found in most dairy products. Lactose intolerance is so common you can buy lactose-free milk in your regular grocery store. Lactose-free products are treated with the enzyme “lactase” that breaks the lactose down before you ingest it. It’s this lactase enzyme that is lacking in most people who are lactose intolerant.

The lactase enzyme is naturally released from your intestine as one of your digestive enzymes. It breaks down the lactose sugar in the gut. When someone doesn’t have enough lactase, the lactose doesn’t get broken down the way it should.  Undigested lactose ends up being food for the resident gut microbes. As they ferment the lactose, they create gases that cause bloating, flatulence, pain, and sometimes diarrhea.

Lactose is in dairy but is in lower amounts in fermented dairy (e.g. cheese & yogurt) and butter. Steering clear of lactose isn’t that easy as it is added to other foods like baked goods, soups, and sauces. And if you’re taking any medications or supplements, check to see if it’s in there too, as lactose is a common ingredient in them.

If you have symptoms of lactose intolerance, keep an eye on food, medication, and supplement labels.

Milk protein (casein & whey) allergy

Milk is a known, and common, food allergen. In Canada, it is considered a “priority allergen” and must be declared on food labels.

So, what are the allergens in milk? You’ve heard of “curds and whey?” Well, these are the two main proteins in milk. The solid bits are the curds (made of casein), and the liquid is the dissolved whey.

Unlike lactose intolerance, casein and whey can cause an actual immune response. It’s an allergy. And this immune response can cause inflammation. In fact, we don’t know how many people have these milk allergies, but most estimates put it far below that of lactose intolerance.

Like lactose, these allergenic milk proteins can be found in other products too. They’re not just in dairy but are often in protein powders as well (Have you heard of “whey” protein powders?).

Some of the symptoms of milk protein allergy differ from that of lactose intolerance; things like nasal congestion and mucus (phlegm) are more common here. And casein seems to be linked with belly fat.

Interestingly, people who have gluten intolerance are often allergic to milk proteins like whey and casein as well. These can go hand-in-hand.

Like lactose intolerance, if you’re allergic to casein and whey keep an eye on labels so you can avoid these.

Conclusion

If you get gassy, bloated, or diarrhea after eating dairy, you may have a lactose intolerance. If you often get a stuffy nose and mucus, then you may be allergic to casein and/or whey.

While dairy may be an entire food group, it is not an essential nutrient. All the nutrients in dairy are available in other foods. If you experience these symptoms, you can try removing dairy from your diet. You may find improved digestion and fewer gut issues. Or you may find improved nasal congestion, or even less belly fat.

If you decide to (or have already) removed dairy from your diet, let me know your experience in the comments below.

References available on request

Yep, you gotta read the small print, its important:

Disclaimer

The information contained herein is NOT intended as medical advice, nor is it intended to replace the care of a qualified health professional. Always consult your doctor for all diagnoses, treatments, and cures for any diseases or conditions, as well as before changing your health care regimen.